Dutch Museums Publish 2 Hidden Pages from Anne Frank's Diary

Dutch Museums Publish 2 Hidden Pages from Anne Frank's Diary

Peter de Bruijn, a senior researcher at the Huygens Institute for the History of the Netherlands, one of the partners in the research, said that the newly uncovered pages are not significant for their sexual content - because Frank explores similar matters in other parts of the diary, often in even more explicit terms.

"These - literally - uncovered texts bring the inquisitive and in many respects precocious teenager back into the foreground".

Researchers using digital technology deciphered the writing on two pages of Anne Frank's diary that she had pasted over with brown masking paper, discovering four naughty jokes and a candid explanation of sex, contraception and prostitution. "She was probably afraid that other people she was hiding with, either her father, her mother or the other family would discover her diary and would read these things", Leopold said.

Her father is also the central source of inspiration for her dirty jokes, and Anne also refers to him visiting a "big house" of prostitution in Paris.

The Anne Frank House Museum said at a presentation that it, and several Dutch historical institutes, were able to reproduce the lost pages after years of study by shining a light through them and photographing them in high resolution. She wrote the recently discovered pages on September 28, 1942 at the age of 13, about three months after the Frank family went into hiding, and later covered them up with brown paper, the Associated Press reports. "The "dirty" jokes are classics among growing children. They make it clear that Anne, with all her gifts, was above all an ordinary girl", he added, according to the Associated Press.

In 2016, the diary was rephotographed by the Anne Frank House and the hidden writing was deciphered.




She covered her racy words under a layer of brown paper to hide them from prying eyes.

Regarding sex, Frank talked about how when a young woman gets her period around the age of 14, it is a "sign that she is ripe to have relations with a man but one doesn't do that of course before one is married".

Anne published two version's of her diary, these pages were found in the first copy, intended only for her self. The family went into hiding in July 1942 and remained there, provided with food and other essentials by a close-knit group of helpers, until August 4, 1944, when they were discovered and ultimately deported to Auschwitz.

She died at 15 in the Bergen-Belsen camp, along with her sister.

Otto Frank, the only family member to survive the Holocaust, returned to Amsterdam after the war.

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