Trump's Proposed Budget for NASA Calls for Return to the Moon

Trump's Proposed Budget for NASA Calls for Return to the Moon

Russian Federation already looking to interfere in 2018 midterms Dems pick up deep-red legislative seat in Missouri Speier on Trump's desire for military parade: "We have a Napoleon in the making" MORE's newly released 2019 budget proposal seeks to end USA government funding for the International Space Station (ISS) by 2025.

"The budget proposes to end direct USA financial support for the International Space Station in 2025, after which NASA would rely on commercial partners for its low Earth orbit research and technology demonstration requirements,", which was released on Monday.

Some private businesses have already dabbled in space exploration and have contributed to the International Space Station project.

NASA now spends about $3 billion a year on station operations and support, maintaining the U.S. segment of the outpost, supplying spare parts and other critical cargo and buying seats aboard Russian Soyuz spacecraft to ferry U.S., European, Canadian and Japanese astronauts to and from the outpost.

The proposed budget for NASA for fiscal year 2019 is at $19.6 billion, about half a billion higher than the requested budget for this year.

President Trump wants NASA to focus more on human exploration to Moon and Mars and that is why it wants the space agency to give less emphasis on ISS in the coming years.

The same budget proposal proposes to pull the plug on WFIRST, a space telescope mission that NASA said is "designed to settle essential questions in the areas of dark energy, exoplanets, and infrared astrophysics".

He said the move would put the USA on course to "do something exciting" in space for the first time in years, adding that his company is "ready" to partner with NASA on its moon efforts.

The Soyuz 2-1a booster carrying the Progress MS-08/69P cargo craft took off from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan at 3:13 a.m. EST (GMT-5; 2:13 p.m. local time), streaking away through a cold, overcast sky and climbing directly into the plane of the space station's orbit.




Putting $150 million toward commercial development for the space station would be a "great indication" the administration is confident in what the private sector can do, CSF executive director Tommy Sanford told CNN.

The directive, which is based on recommendations of the recently re-activated National Space Council (NSC), will refocus NASA on its core mission, space exploration, the White House spokesman said.

"The proposal would also end support for the International Space Station in 2025 and make deep cuts to popular education and science programs", he added.

And SpaceX and Boeing are each developing spacecrafts to send astronauts to and from the space station.

"In short, we are once again on a path to return to the Moon with an eye toward Mars".

According to the Washington Post report, the Trump administration wants to extend the public-private partnership one step further to encourage "the emergence of an environment in [low-Earth orbit] where NASA is one of many customers of a non-governmental human space flight managed and operated enterprise, while providing a smooth and uninterrupted transition".

NASA in 2022 hopes to launch the first portion of a small station to be placed in orbit around the moon.

NASA's acting administrator, Robert Lightfoot, called the plan "very exciting" with lots of potential, despite what he said were some hard decisions that went into it.

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