Alligators survive freezing waters by poking noses through ice

Alligators survive freezing waters by poking noses through ice

"It's interesting to see them poke their noses up and are able to breathe and be perfectly fine so they're doing this as a mechanism so that if it freezes over they can still breathe but just an absolute unbelievable survival technique", Howard said. They respond by sticking their nose above the surface at just the right moment, allowing the water to freeze around them. The family-owned outdoor adventure park's "alligators on ice" video has received tens of thousands of views on Facebook.

The cold snap may be over in North Carolina but have you ever wondered how alligators breathe when ponds and lakes are frozen over. When it gets warm again and the ice melts, the alligators will start thermoregulating their body temperatures.

"I looked around and I was like 'hmmm what is that poking up out of the water?' They nearly look like cypress trees a little bit from afar".

The 65-acre park and sanctuary has a dozen alligators, all of them "rescues" that were previously kept in captivity.

Alligators survive freezing waters by poking noses through ice

Experts from the Shallotte River Swamp Park explained how it's all possible.

"Obviously, that is not optimal, being frozen like that", he said.

George Howard, the park's general manager, told HuffPost that while the frozen alligators in the video appear to be casualties of Old Man Winter, they're very much alive and well. But fortunately for them they have quite the tactic to survive the frozen waters.

After nearly being eradicated in the early 20th century, alligators have made a comeback in North Carolina.




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