Tesla unveils 'the quickest auto in the world'

Tesla unveils 'the quickest auto in the world'

Musk's move to reveal both the truck, and Roadster, is either a distraction so people don't focus too heavily on the company's goal of making the Model 3 a mass production vehicle, or a serious belief in electric technology. The sports vehicle, described as a "hardcore smackdown to gasoline cars" by Musk, will have a range of almost 620 miles on a single charge and go from 0 to 100 mph in 4.2 seconds.

This is a landmark moment for cars because the Tesla Roadster, previous deemed overpriced and relatively less exotic - is suddenly a bargain at ₹1.3 crore since it out accelerates the likes of a Koenigsegg Agera S, and the ₹13 crore Bugatti Chiron.

The four-seat convertible will also do the quarter mile in 8.9 seconds, which would be another record for a production auto.

The company also plans to create a global network of solar-powered "megachargers" that could get the trucks back up to 400 miles of range after charging for only 30 minutes.

In his presentation, Musk said the cost of operating an electric tractor-trailer would be $1.26 per mile, compared with $1.51 per mile in a diesel truck.




At the company's design studio in Hawthorne, California, on Thursday evening, Tesla announced the details of its new all-electric semi truck. Demand for electric trucks is expected to grow over the next decade as the U.S., Europe and China all tighten their emissions regulations. Tesla was scheduled to manufacture 1,500 Model 3 cars in the third quarter of 2017, but has only made 260. They can also be charged overnight. Speeds can reach up to 104 kmph, which is more than what the diesel trucks achieve, while the battery range is around just above 800 km at highway speeds. A Carnegie Mellon study estimated the cost of the Semi's battery pack alone to be roughly $200,000, with the typical diesel truck priced at just $120,000, the BBC points out.

While shares in the company are up more than 40% this year, they have fallen 20% since hitting record highs in mid-September. And charging even a mid-sized truck would likely require a two-hour stop, cutting into companies' efficiency and profits, says Brian Irwin, managing director of the North American industrial group for the consulting firm Accenture.

But even lower costs won't make trucking a sure bet for Tesla.

Musk said Tesla will guarantee the semi's powertrain for one million miles to help alleviate customers' concerns.

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